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Healthcare

Continuous Quality Improvement and Control in Healthcare

Outline

  1. Analysis of how the CQI process is different from TQI.
  2. Description of how the CQI process is managed and led.
  3. List of the kinds of quality improvement tools that are available to implement a CQI plan
  4. Assessment of how information management and technology are used.
  5. Description of how the CQI process contributes to the organization’s overall strategy.
  6. Description of how are medical providers engaged in this process
  7. List of the specific strategies used in the process of positively transforming the organization

Health Care: Continuous Quality Improvement and Control in Healthcare

An analysis of how the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process is different from total quality improvement (TQI) is to identify that quality improvement in health care is a strategy employed to monitor defects emerging from managed care interventions. Hence, continuous reflects constant evaluation and adjustment in procedures, protocols and administrative techniques within subsets of the system. Total looks and quality improvement from the perspective of assessment and intervention of the entire social service structure as in health care reform (McLaughlin & Kaluzny, 2006).

A specific description of how continuous quality improvement (CQI) process is managed and led necessitates embracing strategies administration adapts in execution of CQI activities. One of these include application of PDCA, which means P-plan, D- do, C-check and A- adjust (McLaughlin & Kaluzny, 2006).

The kinds of quality improvement tools that are available to implement a continuous quality improvements (CQI) plan include benchmarking as advocated by Rhonda Hughes (2008). Two types advanced are internal and external. Interval identifies best practices whereas external or competitive requires use of external data obtained from ‘AHRQ’s annual National Health Care Quality Report1 and National Healthcare Disparities Report, 9 as well as several proprietary benchmarking companies or groups (e.g., the American Nurses Association’s National Database of Nursing Quality measures Clearing House’ (Hughes,2008). Six sigma is another tool, which can be useful (improving, designing and monitoring).

 

 

 

An assessment of how information management and technology are used in quality improvement is demonstrated by internal and external benchmarking. Information is plotted on a control chart then statistically applied to upper and lower control limits designs through planning. In this way best practices data is compared within and without the organization in detecting areas for improvement. With the implementation of modern clinical information systems through technology much of this data collection and storage are facilitated by information technology (Hughes, 2008)

In describing of how the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process contributes to the organization’s overall strategy is to identify three key areas of strategy intervention after data is assembled. First measurements for continuous improvement are identified; next training is implemented to analyze measurements and conduct the improvement process. Finally, key organization measurements are shared among employees to benefit the overall operations in their organization (Dana, 2004).

A description of how medical providers are engaged in this process can be cited through managed care interventions as well as organization data sharing comparison techniques. As medical providers document and continuously assess portions of evidence based practice interventions implicit in their clinical information database they make valuable contributions towards detecting irregularities within their organizations. Regular meetings through supporting organizations professional organization all combine and enhance the medical provider’s contributions to continuous quality improvement (CQI)

Specific strategies used in the process of positively transforming the organization are embodied in conducting surveys to gather feedback from staff and clients. In this way there is evidence for supporting irregularities within the system. Next is establishing administrative guidelines. Supervisors must be aware of organizational goals and techniques designed to achieve outcomes. Another strategy is to have specific ways of reporting events. Information technology has now replaced paper trails. As such, staff must be trained to adapt to this new development for accuracy in reporting tasks (Dana, 2004).

Finally tools for quality improvement must be consistent with the desired outcome. For example, if the health care organizations want to measure progress made in reducing post-operative site infections, this tool must measure that specific aspect of care and not extraneous variables such as medication use embodied in this intervention. Data collection must pertain to documenting number of post-operative infection within a given period (Dana, 2004).

References

Dana, B. (2004). Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Readiness Assessment  Process and

                    Tool. American Health Care Association. National Center for Assisted Living.

Hughes, R ( 2008). Tools and Strategies for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. In: Hughes

RG, editor. Patient Safety and Quality: An Evidence-Based Handbook for Nurses.

Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US). Chapter

  1. Retrieved on 4th February from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2682/

McLaughlin, C., & Kaluzny, A. (2006). Continuous Quality Improvement in Health Care (4th

Edition). New York. Jones and Bartlett