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Education Theories

Education Change Management

Education Process Changes

  1. Introduction

Introducing changes in the application process requires careful planning and effective ways of communication. The below paper is designed to highlight the importance of communicating and managing changes in higher education application processes.

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Education Theories

The Role of Digital Technology in Contemporary Education

The digital revolution is no longer a revolution; it is now the new normal. People of all ages are using technology in their everyday lives, from computers to cell phones to tablets to video games and more. These devices are so common that they are reshaping many of the ways that we play, work, and learn. The impact of digital technology on education has been significant, as more and more schools incorporate computers and other technology into classroom settings. One area that remains fraught with controversy, however, is in how that technology is used. There is a burgeoning movement that claims there is a role for the use of video games in schools; supporters of this movement suggest that the use of video games can help students learn in new ways and master the skills they will need for survival and success in the modern world. Detractors insist that video games are little more than a distraction, and that traditional methods of education are still superior. While both sides of this issue make compelling arguments, there is a mounting body of evidence indicating that the use of video games in educational settings can help students learn and succeed.

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Education Theories

Letter from Planet

Introduction

Throughout centuries, there have been scholars and teachers looking for ways to develop systems in education where they are able to plan for goals in what they want their students or followers to comprehend. “Curriculum is an attempt to communicate the essential principles and features of an educational proposal in such a form that is open to critical scrutiny and capable of effective translation into practice.” (Stenhouse, 1975) The ideal of the curriculum is not new, yet it was not formerly named until centuries ago, now it is an essential part of every education outlet in the world. In accomplishing anything worthwhile as far as education, big and small, is dependent on the completion of goals outlined.  An effective curriculum offers all these things as it provides teachers, students, and administrators with the framework and sense of progression.

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Education Theories

Narrative Applications

Initial Character Observations

Roelito is a good student who cares about education, exams and results. Unlike Beto, he studies hard, but not because he “accepts the rules of the house” but because he chooses to. Even Beto says: “The kid took this school business seriously. Beto thought, My little brother’s solid that way.” (p. 7.) He is also forced to grow up fast, as he has to put up with constant arguments between his father and brother. Instead of taking part, he chooses to stay out and help his brother as much as he can. In that way, he is more adult-like and responsible than Beto. He is still frustrated and angry about the situation. He is driven by ambition in school and accepts his father’s belief that the only way to get a better life is to learn and get into a good college. He carefully considers the “most suitable” options. He desperately needs balance and stability in his life.

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Education Theories

Research Paper: Mentoring/Apprenticeship

Mentoring is a common tool used by many organizations to teach younger members of an organization, called protégés, certain attributes to be passed down from a senior member, called a mentor (United States Office of Personnel Management, 2008).  The goal of a mentoring program is to develop these certain attributes in the protégé upon successfully completing a mentoring program according to the guide on mentoring, The Best Practices: Mentoring. The mentoring process has many different uses in both the public and private sector by promoting positive developmental and organizational outcomes.  A common example of how mentoring programs are implemented is they are used by companies to train new or younger employees by senior employees for the sake of career development.

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Education Theories

Cooperative Learning in the Middle Grades

Introduction

In today’s educational environments, it is important to address different concepts and approaches to teaching that will motivate students and keep them interested in the subject matter more effectively. This is an ongoing challenge for many educators to develop or try new strategies to improve learning outcomes for students. Grades K-8 are particularly important because they represent some of the most formidable years of the educational track and require significant attention and support from teachers, parents, and peers. One strategy that has been proven successful under some circumstances is cooperative learning, which reflects the opportunity to acquire knowledge and to learn in smaller teams to achieve the desired learning objectives. Cooperative learning provides students with enhanced learning opportunities across a wide range of subject areas. Cooperative learning is also a viable and effective teaching method because it demonstrates the ability of students to communicate and collaborate to share knowledge and ideas with teacher-based support of this practice. Finally, cooperative learning supports students’ personal growth and development.

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Education Theories

An analytical evaluation of the statement: “Behavioral objectives offer both problems and possibilities in today’s curriculum and evaluation.”

Abstract

This short, one-page, paper will briefly examine the issue of setting behavioural objectives in lessons for educational professionals. Using four separate sources, the question will be considered from the point of view of what setting behavioral objectives can do for achieving positive learning outcomes in a classroom setting.

 

Main Body

It is a truism to state that educational objectives have defined much planning and preparation of professionals in the decades since the Second World War, with much teaching practise focused on meeting specific curricular requirements. In certain environments though, especially in schools and institutions where alienation and disengagement from education is a problem, such as the deprived inner city areas of many western cities, it is fair to say that alternative approaches can sometimes bear fruit. This short paper will examine the statement given in the title, assessing its truth for professional educators.

The first issue to consider is the current effectiveness of setting educational objectives in classroom situations. Educational objectives are used as a measurable way of demonstrating progress from learners. What they often do not take into account though is the readiness and willingness of the class participants to learn. Many students can provide challenges to learning which can often be managed by incorporating behavioral rather than educational objectives into lessons. Certainly, including instructional objectives into lessons with low ability students has been shown to have positive results in the past (Guat,1987, retrieved online). This would suggest that some use of behavioral instruction might also be useful in complementing more specifically educational objectives. As Elliot W. Eisner states: “If educational objectives were really useful tools, teachers, I submit, would use them. If they do not, perhaps it is not because there is something wrong with the teachers, but because there might be something wrong with the theory.” (Curriculum Studies Reader, page 345)

When considering the needs of students with emotional and behavioral difficulties, then it is sometimes necessary to set fundamentals which can be used to feed later academic and educational progress. Some students may not know that it is appropriate to sit quietly during a lesson, for example. By making sitting quietly an objective of the lesson, the student can reinforce his or her understanding of the issue, and also be rewarded for behaving in the correct way. This helps to raise self-esteem, and is a measurable sign of progress, which can then be used to drive real educational attainment. “Teachers use behavioral objectives to guide and improve classroom instruction for groups of students, manage classroom social behaviors, and support individual students in need of more intensive social and academic instruction and support (Alberto & Trout-man, 1999; Maag, 2004).” (Freeman, retrieved from http://www.education.com/reference/article/behavioral-objectives/)

This viewpoint is further developed by E. O. Omosewo, in his study on the impact of setting behavioral objectives on the learning of physics students. He states: “Physics, which is a subject which is tagged as being difficult, can be made ‘easy’ if teachers make use of behavioral objectives when teaching.” (Omosewo, p. 95). It would seem that identifying appropriate behaviors and setting them out in clear and specific terms, can produce meaningful results in terms of improved pupil performance. It is important to always be clear and focused when setting such objectives though.

Setting behavioural objectives would seem, therefore, to offer more possibilities than problems to the modern education professional. Certainly, adopting them and using them in practical, classroom situations, can bring positive results, and is something which many professionals might incorporate into their practise.

References

Elliot W. Eisener, Educational Objectives: Help or Hindrance?, taken from David J. Finders and Stephen J.Thornton,  The Curriculum Studies Reader pages 337 – 348)

Rachel Freeman Behavioral Objectives , Retrieved from http://www.education.com/reference/article/behavioral-objectives/, 03/15/2013

Teo Boon Guat, The effectiveness of using instructional objectives with less able secondary school pupils, Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 1987, retrieved from http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet3/teo.html, 03/15/2013

  1. O. Omesewo, The impact of the use of behavioral objectives on students’ achievement in Physics, retrieved from http://www.unilorin.edu.ng/publications/omosewo/Innovative%20Approaches%20to%20Edu%20&%20Human%20Development%20Vol.pdf, 03/15/2013

 

 

 

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Education Theories

Asexual reproduction evolutionary prop

Educational Theory

Proposal: Nature is life and life is in nature and by this philosophy, ideal relationships can generate asexual products within the confines of an ideal evolutionary design.

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Education Theories

Theorist Think Paper

Various early childhood programs exist globally.  These programs focus on various early childhood development aspects.  Further, the programs base their operations on different philosophies and theorists (Gordon and Browne 12).  Therefore, this paper seeks to give an insight into the Head start early childhood program.

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Education Theories

Collaborative Leadership

Leadership is mostly defined according to activities of leaders rather than by the process. Collaborative leadership on the contrary is defines by the process and not by the acts of leaders. Collaborative leadership according to Chrislip and Larson (1994) starts when “You bring the appropriate people together in constructive ways with good information, they will create authentic visions and strategies for addressing the shared concerns of the organization or community.” This paper tries to analyze the statement made by Chrislip and Larson (1994) about collaboration “The purpose of collaboration is to create a shared vision and joint strategies to address concerns that go beyond the purview of any particular party”  and to discuss Collaborative Leadership as it relates to school management and administration. For the purpose this paper will analyze the role of establishing a shared vision in establishing collaborative leadership. Further this will evaluate the potential effectiveness of collaborative leadership in creating a school climate that promotes student achievement.

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Education Theories

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick “Making Gay Menaings” and “Thinking Through Queer Theory”

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick:

“Making Gay Meanings” and “Thinking through Queer Theory”

Making Gay Meanings

In “Making Gay Meanings,” Sedgwick begins by discussing an issue perceived by the author as largely dismissed or unseen in American culture, that of how minority status provides convenient political and social identity.  She makes the case that, ironically, assimilation seems to have occurred most easily as those minorities involved have been all the more defined as different.  This is a movement or cultural process Sedgwick dates to the African American Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, and she goes on to note how the same, separatist foundation has served other minority cause since.  She asserts that this infusion of separate identities into the mainstream society is what enables the modern, and self-aggrandizing, self-perception of the nation as “diversified” and “multicultural” (Sedgwick  184).  She then goes on to observe that this same separatist thinking, based on the ontological aspects of minorities, is seized upon today; those who act out of repressive motives, for example, identify themselves as Christians, and the implication is that the assumed minority status gives weight to their right to speak out.   The point Sedgwick makes in this introduction is that important political and social currents are ignored in this process.  Returning to the black Civil Rights movement, the author makes this point by noting how, as that movement evolved, it reflected and incorporated a variety of other cultural, social, and political movements, including the anti-war, the drug culture, and the student uprising elements.  In short, Sedgwick begins here by noting how the construct of identity has consistently been an obfuscation in understanding the nature of minority movements, if it has been, and remains, a highly convenient one.

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Education Theories

Educational Theories

“ The child had her left arm wrapped around the provider’s neck and her fist was closed on a lock of the provider’s hair.  The child’s right hand was grasping a portion of the provider’s apron cover-up.  The provider said, “Look who’s here Annie!” as she pointed to the student volunteer.  The child smiled briefly and buried her head in the provider’s shoulder.  The student said, “Annie, how would you like to slide down the ramp today?”  There was no response from the child.  The provider walked toward the ramp and knelt with one knee on the floor and the left knee supporting the child.  She whispered something to Annie.  The child looked up at the ramp and “dove” off the provider’s knee.  She landed directly on the side of the ramp and scrambled up to the top.”

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Education Theories

Aerobic Kickboxing Assignment and Grading Rubric

Alternative Assessment:  Aerobic Project

In this project, the students are expected to work individually to create original kickboxing aerobic routines.