Categories
Latin-American Studies

“The Inhabited Woman,” Nature, and Independence: Parallels and Contrasts

Introduction

The novel “The Inhabited Woman” by Giaconda Belli addresses the role of female empowerment and strength in the context of humanity and its relationship to nature. The story considers the transformation of a woman striving for equal footing in a largely male-dominated environment. This novel reflects a greater understanding of the different perspectives of individuals and their perceptions of the natural environment. This book also considers the role of nature and the ability of human beings to reflect upon relationships and how individuals behave around each other. It is these behaviors that shape the lives of human beings and support the development of new ideas and choices that impact the self and others in their circle. The author’s perspective will be conveyed in the following paragraphs and will address the protagonist’s journey through life and love.

Categories
Latin-American Studies

Motorcycle Diaries

Walter Salles’ film The Motorcycle Diaries (2004) explores the connection between the long journey taken across South America by Che  Guevara when he was twenty-three years old and his later role as a political revolutionary. On his journey, which is taken mostly o0n a motorcycle, Che and his companion, Alberto, observe many things that cause them to reconsider the way that they view social and political conditions in Latin America.  The movie portrays the changes that happened to Che as the result of the poverty and deprivation that he witnessed on his trek across many regions. The viewer is initiated into the same kind of anger and political angst that functioned as the true starting point of Che’s career as a reformer and a radical. Because of this, the movie functions not only as a biographical portrait, but as a political argument. The thesis or main argument presented by the film is that revolution against tyranny is a noble goal.

Categories
Latin-American Studies

Rigoberta Menchu

The narrative I, Rigoberta Menchu (1983) recounts the struggle of an individual to maintain her self-identity and sense of cultural pride despite experiencing fierce oppression. The oppression that is experienced by Rigoberta  is based on  cultural injustices that emerge from social class, gender, and racism. In the narrative, Rigoberta explains the ways in which she fought to preserve her Mayan culture. She represents her identity as being a part of a long-lived heritage that is threatened by  the ladinos, which are those Guatemalans that seek to eradicate Indian culture and Indian values. She explains that the meaning of her self-identity and its value is connected to her heritage and culture and to fighting to save and protect this culture from those who are oppressors and exploiters.

Categories
Latin-American Studies Other

How identity has been represented, imagined, or negotiated.

How identity has been represented, imagined, or negotiated?

In the story “la rueda del lambriento”Alicia Mendoza is one of the female characters, a nurse by profession and who was sent to work in outer Chiapas. Alicia is used to point out the suffering encountered by indigenous people in southern state; especially women

The relationship between Alicia and the doctor is not well thriving, Alicia’s withdrawal from the services portrays misunderstanding between her and the doctor. Alicia like other female character reveals the way female are undermined and not recognized. Alicia’s realization of autonomy is portrayed through her successful exit from the clinic and her dignified negation of his male knowledge.

Alicia is viewed as awkward, undesirable and clumsy this is only because she is a woman. She represents those women with passion, strength and greater potential to change miserable life’s especially how women are viewed. Alicia is viewed as an ugly female figure.

Alicia’s experience in the working profession reveals struggle that women undergo to be accepted and recognized in the masculine dominated profession. She faces great humiliation. The boundaries that restrict Alicia as female need to be revised along with the rest of her cultural knowledge.

Alicia’s fantasy still encompasses female roles such as raising, children and washing clothes this reveals the socialized boundaries of femaleness. Through Alicia castellanos appeal for total erase of body traces to be a complete revelation of Cixou’s dictum and one which arise brutal suppression of the body in order for female creativity to be achieved.

Class and ethnicity is important pointer of female difference in castellanos female characters, this is majorly faced by educated women. Restriction meaning to female body points to constructedness of gender. The vision of female creativity based on female body represents frustrations of female attempts at self definition within the constraining patriarchal set up.

Categories
Latin-American Studies Other

The Luck of Teodoro Mendez Acubal

Rosario Castellanos’ The Luck of Teodoro Mendez Acubai is a narrative focused on the social and historical identities of its characters, presented through their own perspectives upon the world. The two most prominent characters, that of the title character of Teodoro Mendez Acubai, a rural worker and native Mexican Indian, and Don Augustin Velasco, a merchant of European heritage, each view the narrative from their social and historical identity, which thus informs their take on events. Hence, both of these characters portray the roles that are given to them by social and historical discourse.

Teodoro Mendez Acubai, therefore, at the outset of the narrative finds a silver coin which sets in motion the story. The reason why Teodoro finds the coin is consistent with his social status, as established in the very first sentence: “Walking through the streets of Jobel (with lowered eyelids as befitted his humble person) Acubal Teodoro Mendez found a coin.” Thus, the turn in Teodoro’s life begins when he follows his social status: he finds the coin because of the humiliated status of the native within a highly segregated society.

Much in the same manner, Don Augustin views Acubai with a suspcision, looking upon him as the conquerer upon the conquered. Thus, Augustin views him as a lower form of life, prone to savagery and violence. When he sees Acubai intending to buy something, all the social stereotypes shapes his thoughts, suggesting to him that the Indians are planning a revolt. Augustin thus informs those of his race and class: “His sense of solidarity of race, class and occupation forced him to communicate his suspicions to other traders and the police occurred together. The neighborhood was on notice thanks to the diligence of Augustin.” Hence, in both cases, the initial reactions of both characters is the direct product of their status within Mexican society.

When Teodoro finall enters the store to purchase something, thus breaking with his social identity, the result is tragedy: Augustin brandishes a gun at him for merely entering the store, suspecting Teodoro has violent intents, and Teodoro is ultimately taken away by the police. Castellanos can thus be said to represent the social structure of Mexico itself, showing the logical conclusions of the social identities that exist in Mexico as well as divisions.

Accordingly, identity in Castellanos text is filtered through social and historical legacies. The only time in the story when these identities are broken is when Teodoro thinks about what he will purchase with the coin he has found and decides to enter the store. But then once again the social identities show their dominance, causing him to be locked up. The identities of Castellanos’ characters are not represented, imagined or negotiated through the individual characters themselves, but rather the society and history that has conditioned these same identities.

The Luck of teodoro Mendez Acubal