Categories
Aviation

Who Did Airport Security before TSA and how Airport Security Changed Since 9/11

Abstract

This research takes a qualitative look at how airport security and safety have changed since the creation of TSA.  The author will also do a detailed analysis of security procedures prior to and post 9/11.  The United States airline industry has undergone several changes within recent years.  There have been many problems that have impacted airline travel and safety include the threat of another terrorist attack. There is a great deal of public opinion regarding problems with TSA security procedures and checks that have directly affected the safeness of airlines.  In addition, the new technologies and aggressive tactics have done little to curb individuals from getting back security checkpoints with dangerous materials on them. Studies have shown the level of impact of TSA in airlines today.  This paper will examine if airports are safer since the creation of 9/11 compared to security procedures prior to TSA.

Categories
Political Science

U.S. Imperialism and Islam

The tragedy of 9/11 made many Americans wonder why political Islam hated America. Many among us reached the conclusion, primarily due to media’s influence as well as claims by opportunistic politicians, that political Islam hated the freedom enjoyed by Americans as well as their economic achievements and was determined to destroy the country out of jealousy. As is often the case with opinions based on emotional reasoning, this conclusion was faulty. While it may be true that many of the rights taken for granted by Americans are in conflict with the moral and ethical worldview proposed by the political Islam, the conflict is more the outcome of America’s imperialistic ambitions since the 20th century rather than the cultural differences between the East and the West.

Categories
English

Freedom, Privacy, and Security

The tragic event of 9/11 initiated a series of debates in the public arena one of which was the extent to which citizens’ privacy and freedom could be compromised by the government for the sake of improving their overall safety and security. The U.S. Government took several steps to improve intelligence surveillance one of which was the Patriot Act. Under the Patriot Act, the government has several powers which may violate the privacy or freedom of an individual such as engaging in search and seizure on the basis of even slight suspicion and wiretapping a person or an institution without notifying them (ACLU). Similarly, contrary to popular notion, the right to freedom of speech is not absolute even in America. Even if one may attribute the terrorist attacks against the U.S. and its interests to the U.S. Government’s aggressive foreign policy, any kind of support for regimes or organizations working against U.S. interests could lead to prosecution by the U.S. Government. While freedom of speech/action and right to privacy are valuable rights, compromising them for overall public safety and security is the right thing to do because it increases the overall welfare of the society.

Categories
Political Science

Offense as Defense: U.S. Foreign Policy After 9/11

Introduction

It is an extraordinary thing that one single event can alter the directions taken by the greatest nationalist power in the world.  This, however, is exactly what occurred with the United States following the terrorist strikes of September 11, 2001.  Prior to this, the U.S. had been conducting foreign relations in ways reliant chiefly on mutual interest, diplomatic agendas, and commercial and military concerns.  More importantly, it had done so from a position of unquestioned authority, if not outright dominance, and this was a position largely due to a perceived invulnerability.  After 9/11, circumspection and caution would take the place of confidence in international relations.  Beyond this, a new component of immense import was added, in that it became essential for the U.S. to comprehend which of its global ties was not affiliated in any way with those forces out to destroy it.  Essentially, 9/11 changed U.S. foreign policy in many ways, but the most overt is the modern and ongoing aggression prompted by a new sense of extreme vulnerability.