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African-American Studies

Annotation on “Myth of the Negro Past”

“Myths of Negro Past” Chapter Five: pgs. 110-142

Chapter Five of the book “Myths of Negro Past” deals primarily with the various and complex ways Africans transposed their culture to adapt to their new lives in both the North American, as well as the South American, continents. Though the chapter as a whole overall shows how African culture was distributed and assimilated, as well as preserved though the America’s, it definitely proves without a doubt that these customs carried over from West Africa by the slave trade were much better preserved in the Central and South American regions.

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African-American Studies

African American Slave Culture

Europe’s racist tendencies towards African’s during the Transatlantic Slave period stemmed from a lack of their ability to understand a culture so different from their own. A major anthropological consideration in studying racism is the concept of ethnocentricity; many societies’ asses other cultures using their own values and believe their own way of life to be superior. Before the Transatlantic Slave period, the Europeans had not had much interaction with the Africans; therefore the behaviors, beliefs, values, and language they observed greatly shocked them because they were so unfamiliar. As a result, Jordan claims in “First Impressions that the Europeans believed the Africans to be savage, heathenistic, beastly, and inferior. In order to fully understand racism in a historical context, it is necessary to interpret the reasoning behind Europe’s feelings of inferiority towards the African community.

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African-American Studies

The struggles and achievements of African-American women between Reconstruction and the present era

Introduction

This discussion focuses on struggles and achievements of African American women between the reconstruction periods up to present time. Precisely, it embraces reflection profiles of nineteen century African American women, inevitably, comparing them with the twenty first century evolutionary manifestations now present in our society. It is true that all over the world women collectively or individually as a social gender have been marginalized to the mercy of male chauvinism.

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African-American Studies

The Impact of Music on African-Americans in the 1960s And 1970s

The 1960’s and 1970s played host to some of the most spirited changes to take place in American society.  This  era shaped major changes in music, politics, revolutionary movements and led to an explosion of individual expression.  It was also an era of the growth of  African American youth involvement in politics, education, social issues and music. As a result of the African American music influence, many American youths were exposed to  new forms of  music and stylish clothing while expressing themselves politically and socially. The cultural change was not greeted or accepted at first because the normal sound of the sixties still magnified the sound of Elvis Presley, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. It did not match the new music followed by African American youths. The 1960’s were a time of upheaval in society, fashion, attitudes, and especially music. Before 1963, the music of the sixties still reflected the sound, style, and beliefs of the previous decade and many of the hit records were by artists who had found mainstream success in that fifties  (ThePeopleHistory.Com).

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African-American Studies

Which Came First: Slavery or Racism

Introduction

In seeking to understand if racism existed before slavery, or if slavery was in fact a development of racism, there is an inescapable dilemma; namely, the two so rely on one another that it is difficult to conceive of either as existing without the other.   A society that allows for one race to be actually enslaved must believe on a deep level that it is racially superior to the victims.  At the same time, it is likely that the institution of slavery, however it comes into being, must promote ideas of racism within those empowered to practice it.  To an extent, then, there can be no real answer to the question simply because the processes of slavery and racism are inextricably linked.  This acknowledged, it must as well be recognized that, if a “bottom line” approach is taken, some form of racism must be in existence before any type of slavery can be in place.  At some point and on some level, the society must believe it has the right to enslaves because the slaves, when designated by race, are racially inferior.  Slavery certainly validates the belief, as legislation usually provides a kind of ethical sanction for ideologies.  Nonetheless, and no matter the variations in policies, laws, and societal attitudes, the ultimate conclusion is that slavery could not exist without racism generating it.

Categories
African-American Studies

Arthur Ashe.

Arthur Ashe. Interesting facts