Categories
Political Science

Late Night Comedy in Election 2000

The three assigned articles, Young’s “Late Night Comedy in Election 2000: Its Influence on Candidate Trait Ratings and the Moderating Effects of Political Knowledge and Partisanship”, Ellsworth’s “Rationality and Campaigning: A Content Analysis of the 1960 Presidential Campaign Debates”, and Kaye & Sopolsky’s “Offensive Language in Prime Time Television: Before and After Content Ratings”, provide three different examples of how content analysis may be applied to forms of public discourse as filtered through the media. Whereas the themes of each article are essentially different, they demonstrate a homogeneity, in so far as here data collection and its analysis serves as the foundation for social and political analysis. However, it would also seem that the legitimacy of these analyses are ultimately determined by the precise content being analyzed: that is to say that the basic common methodology to all three texts is germane not from the perspective of methodology alone, but from the context in which this methodology operates.

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Management

Self-reflection Journal: R&D Case

The first lesson from R&R case is the importance of paying close attention to the external environment to look for opportunities as well as monitor the competitors’ behavior. Bob Reiss knew Trivia games will be hit in the U.S. after his observation of the Canadian market because both markets had similar characteristics and trends over time. He also knew that the competition will soon jump in and flood the market with similar items. He used these insights to achieve as much differentiation from the competition as possible and come up with an effective distribution and pricing strategy. This is why R&R didn’t have to discount their products like other competitors because they did their homework and got everything right the first time.

Categories
Management

Self-reflection Journal: Barry Nall Case

The first major lesson from Barry Nalls’ entrepreneurial successes is that successful organizations are not in the business of offering products or solutions to their customers but a solution to a problem or a need. Instead of creating a product and service first and hoping the market will accept it, Nalls looked at the challenges faced by enterprises and realized that the technology being used by service providers could also be used by enterprise companies to improve their operations. When Nalls founded a second company named VYBRANZ, the new business model was again designed around working with customers to discover ways to cut costs without sacrificing quality. Nalls’ success has been due to his belief that the key to success is understanding customers’ needs and desires and designing solutions around them.