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The Development of Cities in the U.S. During the Early 19th Century

In the early 1800s, the United States saw a period of great growth due to the Industrial Revolution. The Industrial Revolution was a move towards a new manufacturing process in America and increased the average income of the citizens and as well as the population of the country as a whole. After the War of 1812, America gained a newfound sense of nationalism, and cities began to prosper based on the products and services the city could produce.

In the south, cotton gins began to emerge- which radically increased the value of slave labor. In Massachusetts, textile mills drew people to towns like Lowell and those areas continued to industrialize, while in the west frontiersmen like Davy Crockett and James Fenimore Cooper continued to explore new territory, expanding the land in the United States.

As places like Lowell Massachusetts thrived from the end of the Industrial Revolution, President Andrew Jackson was waging a war against the Native Americans all over the country- forcing them out of their homes and making them relocate to settlements he established. Many died on the way and the journey of the Native Americans has been come to known as the Trail of Tears.

The 19th century in America saw rapid expansion in the west, industrial development in the north and the creation of the cotton mill in the south. As some chose to say where they were and utilize the growth of the U.S. to their advantage, others chose to head to other cities where they thought they would have more opportunities.

Works Cited:

“Industrial Revolution.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 31 May 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution>.

Whiteley, Peggy. “19th Century American Culture.” Lonestar College Library. Lonestar College, 2003. Web. 31 May 2013. <http://kclibrary.lonestar.edu/19thcentury1800.htm>.